Article | October 15, 2012

Containment And Isolation

By Jason Frye

Fifteen years ago, Flow Sciences was in the testing certification business when scientists and safety officers concerned for workers in need of proper containment when working with potent compounds approached them. Requests for containment solutions came in from many industries and areas of academic study and over time, increasingly pharmaceutical companies expressed interest in containment and isolation systems for their own lab and material handlers.

“We were asked to provide containment for drug discovery and development,” says Ray Ryan, founder and President of Flow Sciences. “The initial order was for equipment not more than 2’ wide and 2’ deep – the assumed minimum footprint required for the new Vented Balance Safety Enclosure.”

As growth in the number of chemicals and caustic raw materials swelled, so did the need for safe containment. Add to this the increased potency in many materials and the appearance of regulations – from state to federal and company policy – intended to create safer work environments, and the need for protected bench space became more relevant than ever.

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